MENU
ricky-gervais-anti-hunting-cover

The Hypocrisy of Ricky Gervais Anti-Hunting Crusade

May 16, 2015 Comments (5) Views: 2161 CONSERVATION

The Hunters Perspective on the Killing of Cecil

killing-of-cecil

With recent news of iconic African animals being killed, in this case Cecil the Lion, it is important for society to realize that false information is recklessly creating the perception that hunters are to blame. In today’s modern world, it can be very unfortunate that perception can be far more formidable then reality. This effect can be attributed purely to one’s emotions. Rational people generally research facts and base their views according to those facts, while emotionally minded people react differently to information and often form views based on others opinions and perceptions.

As with anything in life, there are those who participate in society in a legal manner which benefits all involved. At the same time there are those who act illegally, which is detrimental to any cause and often perceived by many as a representation of all persons who partake in similar acts, regardless of legality.

In the global hunting community, those who act illegally are known as poachers. By definition, a poacher is someone who partakes in the illegal practice of trespassing on another’s property to hunt or steal game without permission or any encroachment on another’s property, rights, ideas, or the like. The people who participated in the killing of the iconic Cecil the Lion were poachers, not hunters. Referring to these people as “hunters” is an uneducated perception of what a “hunter” actually is.

Hunter, by definition, is listed as a person who hunts game or other wild animals for food or in sport. With the amount of known science and technology readily available today hunters are one step beyond that definition in that they are participating members of a sustainable ecosystem who act as stewards of our wildlife by re-establishing, maintaining and preserving viable wildlife populations. Hunters take part in active conservation and preservation of wildlife in its truest form.

While hunting lions is not an illegal activity, in the case of Cecil the Lion, the hunt was conducted illegally and Cecil’s death was wrongful. Lion quotas are very strict and the proper permit was not obtained by the landowner and/or the Professional Hunter.  Although the man who shot Cecil claims he put his trust in the Professional Hunter, it is the responsibility of each individual to ensure they are abiding by conservation laws. Hunters would not unethically bait an iconic animal such as Cecil away from a national preserve and treat an animal with such disrespect as to take only the head and pelt while leaving the rest to rot. Hunters have the utmost respect for the game they so passionately pursue.

No legal and professional hunting organization condones the unlawful harvest of any species and this case is no different. The stigma that poachers like Walter Palmer, the American dentist from Minnesota, as well as Zimbabweans Honest Trymore Ndlovu and Theo Bronchorst have brought to the hunting community is something that most will perceive as an act of hunting which it is absolutely not. The perception that Cecil was killed by hunters is one that has penetrated deep into society at a rapid pace.

There is hope that society will realize that Cecil was killed by poachers and not hunters as the remaining facts are revealed in days to come following investigations by Zimbabwean authorities. The difference is clear. From a hunters perspective this is the upmost disrespect for the conservation efforts and sustainable system we strive to achieve. A poacher in no friend to the hunter, but rather an enemy.

5 Responses to The Hunters Perspective on the Killing of Cecil

  1. K Walko says:

    You do not respect something that you then kill.
    Killing by definition does not conserve or sustain anything but the Hemingway myth of the great white hunter.
    Try using a camera instead to understand what you are really dealing with.

    • scott says:

      do you eat meat? if so you don’t obviously hunt? correct? but you buy your meat from a store or killing plant? correct? did you take a picture before they cut that animals throat or used a gun that has a bolt that shoots out of it with forced air? guess not…to this day my family lives healthier by the wild game and fish that we bring into our home, the hunted way…we do not eat store bought meat, we do not put htat shit in our bodies…you are intitle to your opinion but for crying out loud get your facts straight once and for all…

      great outdoorsman and women from past, present and future..

    • Ronnie Sapehoodle says:

      K Walko you sound very uneducated sir.

  2. Tom says:

    in response to the first comment, you can respect what you kill. I’m a hunter. I love deer. a healthy deer herd brings joy to me. I don’t kill mercilessly…i hunt for a spiritually fulfilling way to gain food that my family enjoys. It is nice that we can get meat in a more organic and natural way than mass produced beef wrapped in cellophane from the grocery store. I understand I took a life, and appreciate that life, i guess i would rather just do the dirty work myself if i’m going to eat meat.
    Also, what contributes to the Cecil debacle is the personification of a wild animal. Cecil wasn’t Cecil, he was a wild lion. Wild animals are not ornaments for us to label as delicate, they’re not out pets. If you want to name an animal, name it meat. Cecil might have been a “celebrity” but I guarantee, you only tag a lion because you knocked it out first. people need to realize, a lion would make lunch out of them in a heartbeat if given the chance…they are not pets.

  3. Mrs W says:

    If you seriously beleive ‘investigations by Zimbabwean authorities’ is the way forward, you are more deluded than I originally thought. The person who provides the paperwork with the most amont of US dollars, will win. Walter probably went to Zimbabwe in the first place, because it is so corrupt, you can get whatever you want with green notes, in Zimabawe. And being such an experienced hunter, Waltere would have known that.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *